Transgender's Classification as 'Mental Disorder' Is Outdated, Study Finds

The latest from: http://www.health.com/mind-body/transgenders-classification-mental-disorder-outdated-study-finds

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Being transgender is currently classified as a mental health disorder in the World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases (ICD), but a new study suggests that should change.

And, such a change wouldn’t be without precedent. The American Psychiatric Association removed gender identity disorder from the latest edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).

For the new study, Mexican researchers interviewed 250 transgender people.

The researchers found levels of distress were more strongly influenced by social rejection and violence than by being transgender.

Seventy-six percent said they suffered social rejection due to being transgender. This rejection most often came from family members, followed by schoolmates/co-workers and friends, the study showed.

Nearly two-thirds were victims of violence due to their gender identity, the researchers found.

Family members were responsible for nearly half of the cases of violence. The most common types of violence were mental and physical violence. Some of those surveyed reported sexual violence, the study revealed.

This study is the first of its kind, the researchers said. Others are now being conducted in Brazil, France, India, Lebanon and South Africa, the researchers added.

Findings from the study were published July 26 in The Lancet Psychiatry.

“Stigma associated with both mental disorder and transgender identity has contributed to the precarious legal status, human rights violations and barriers to appropriate care among transgender people,” study senior author Geoffrey Reed said in a journal news release. Reed is a professor at the National Autonomous University of Mexico.

“The definition of transgender identity as a mental disorder has been misused to justify denial of health care and contributed to the perception that transgender people must be treated by psychiatric specialists, creating barriers to health care services,” he said.

Reed said some governments have used the definition of transgender as a mental health disorder in courts to deny people their rights in matters of child custody, reproduction and changing legal documents.

Study lead investigator Rebeca Robles said, “Our findings support the idea that distress and dysfunction may be the result of stigmatization and maltreatment, rather than integral aspects of transgender identity.” Robles is from the Mexican National Institute of Psychiatry.

She said these findings need to be confirmed with additional studies before the next approval of the revision of the WHO International Classification of Diseases in 2018.

“Rates of experiences related to social rejection and violence were extremely high in this study, and the frequency with which this occurred within participants’ own families is particularly disturbing,” Robles said.

“Unfortunately, the level of maltreatment experienced in this sample is consistent with other studies from around the world. This study highlights the need for policies and programs to reduce stigmatization and victimization of this population. The removal of transgender diagnoses from the classification of mental disorders can be a useful part of those efforts,” she concluded.

More information

For more about transgender issues, visit GLAAD.

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Does Dementia Diagnosis Have Silver Lining for Some?

The latest from: http://www.health.com/mind-body/does-dementia-diagnosis-have-silver-lining-some

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Is it possible that a diagnosis as devastating as dementia could have some positive effects?

Yes, a small study suggests.

Researchers asked 48 people with early dementia or mild cognitive impairment to complete a questionnaire that measured their quality of life and personal outlook after getting their diagnosis.

The “Silver Lining Questionnaire” was designed to measure how much patients believe their illness has a positive impact in areas such as: relationships, appreciation for life, positive influence on others, inner strength and life philosophy.

The questionnaire has been used before with cancer patients. But, this was the first time it was used with dementia/mild cognitive impairment patients, the researchers said.

“The overall assumption is that this diagnosis would have a uniformly negative impact on a patient’s outlook on life, but we were surprised to find that almost half of respondents reported positive scores,” said study author Dr. Gregory Jicha, a professor at the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky.

The patients in the study had high scores on areas such as: appreciation and acceptance of life; less concern about failure; self-reflection, tolerance of others, and courage to face problems in life; stronger relationships and new opportunities to meet people.

“The common stereotype for this type of diagnosis is depression, denial and despair,” Jicha said in a university news release.

“However, this study — while small — suggests that positive changes in attitude are as common as negative ones,” he said.

The study was to be presented Monday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto. Findings presented at meetings are generally viewed as preliminary until they’ve been published in a peer-reviewed journal.

The next phase in this research is to determine the factors that led some dementia patients to see the positive in their diagnosis. That information can likely be used to help other patients, the researchers said.

More information

The Alzheimer’s Association has more on dementia.

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Got Ringing in Your Ears? Here's How to Cope With Tinnitus

The latest from: http://www.health.com/mind-body/tinnitus-treatment

You might be the only one who can hear the ringing in your ears, but that doesn’t mean you’re alone. A new study published in JAMA Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery found that 1 in 10 adults suffers from tinnitus, or the perception of noise that isn't actually there.

For some people it's a high-pitched buzz. Others might hear a low roar, hissing, or clicking. Tinnitus may come and go, or never stop. And doctors may never determine the exact cause of the symptom.

It can be triggered by anything from a buildup of earwax or a very loud concert to a blood vessel disorder or age-related hearing loss. Even some antidepressants and other meds can trigger a phantom noise.

Unfortunately for most chronic cases, there's no cure, as the American Tinnitus Association points out. But there are steps you can take to manage the symptom. For tips on coping with the ringing, we tapped Sarah Mowry, MD, an assistant professor and member of the Ear, Nose & Throat Institute at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Here, Dr. Mowry's tips for anyone bothered by the noise.

Mask it

If you're having trouble concentrating or resting, turn on some white noise. You could use a sound machine, a fan, or even the TV at low volume. “These help your brain suppress the [phantom] noise so it’s less bothersome,” Dr. Mowry explains. 

RELATED: 7 Best White Noise Machines for a Good Night's Sleep

Try to de-stress

Tinnitus can actually be a sign from your body that it's time to take a breather, says Dr. Mowry. “My patients will say they’re not sure why [their tinnitus is] so bad today, and then it turns out they’re stressed and not sleeping,” says Dr. Mowry. When you put stress management techniques into practice (like breathing exercises, or gentle stretching before bed), you may find that you don't notice the noise as much.

Consider biofeedback

If your usual tension-busting measures don’t help, you might want to look into biofeedback therapy, in which you learn to control your body's physical reaction to stress. Dr. Mowry compares some cases of tinnitus to phantom pain (or sensation perceived in a body part that's been amputated); when a patient is suffering from tinnitus from hearing loss, she explains, it may be that "their brain is trying to fill in missing information" with the phantom noise. "For those patients, we do a lot of biofeedback," she says.

Or tinnitus retraining therapy

A combination of biofeedback, psychotherapy, and music therapy, tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) is another option for patients who are struggling to live with the noise, says Dr. Mowry. It can be difficult to find a practitioner, she warns, and may not be covered by your insurance plan. But when nothing else has worked, TRT can make a world of difference.

Join up

It may be helpful to connect with others who are dealing with the same problem, Dr. Mowry points out. By attending meetings of a tinnitus support group, not only will you realize you're not alone, but you'll be able to share coping strategies with the people you meet. 

RELATED: 15 Everyday Sounds and How They Affect Your Hearing

Protect your ears

“Tinnitus gets worse as hearing loss gets worse,” explains Dr. Mowry, which means it's really important to protect your ears when you know you'll be exposed to loud noise. Dr. Mowry recommends taking precautions such as wearing earplugs when you blow dry your hair (seriously!) or go to a concert. Research suggests earplugs really do help: A study published last month found that only 12% of concert-goers who wore them experienced ringing in their ears afterwards, compared to 40% of people who didn't use ear protection.

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Katie Seaver: To Diet Or Not Diet: Science Weighs In

The latest from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/katie-seaver/to-diet-or-not-diet-scien_b_11186956.html

Here’s the question I have for you, no matter what path you are considering going down in terms of eating, weight, and happiness: Where do you want to be, two years from now? And what is going to help you get there?

Read more: Diet, Diet and Nutrition, Diet and Fitness, Weight Loss, Weight Loss Tips, How to Lose Weight, Intuitive Eating, Clean Eating, Healthy Living News

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Peter Weintraub : Breakfast Rules For Weight Loss

The latest from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/peter-weintraub-/breakfast-rules-for-weigh_b_11193404.html

Main Takeaway: If you’re hungry for breakfast, eat a high-fat, moderate-protein meal consisting of foods like eggs, bacon, sausage, avocado, nuts and seeds and coconut oil. If you’re not usually hungry for it, DON’T EAT IT!

Read more: Weight Loss, Weight Loss Tips, Nutrition, Diet and Nutrition, Diet, Diet and Fitness, Dieting, Healthy Living, Healthy Living Health News, Healthy Eating, Healthy Lifestyle, Healthy Living Body, Healthy Food, Breakfast, Healthy Living News

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Strawberry chip protein scone recipe

The latest from: http://www.womenshealthandfitness.com.au/diet-nutrition/recipe-finder/2068-strawberry-chip-protein-scones-recipe

Do you have a soft spot for scones? Try these wheat and sugar free, high-protein scones for your next high tea.

What you’ll need

The scones

1 cup oat flour (ground quick oats)
½ cup vanilla protein powder 
¼ cup rolled oats
½ tsp baking soda
¼ tsp sea salt
3 tbsp coconut oil
1 egg white
¼ cup strawberry Greek yogurt
2 tbsp almond milk
3 sachets Stevia
3 tbsp dark chocolate chips

Mixed berry jam

1 cup frozen mixed berries (thawed)
2 sachets of Stevia
2 tsp chia seeds

Natural fat-free whipped ‘cream’ 

½ cup non-fat dry milk 
½ cup ice water 
1 egg white  
1 tsp lemon juice 
¼ cup powdered sugar, sifted (you can use Stevia, quarter teaspoon or to taste)
½ tsp vanilla extract

What you’ll do

The scones

Preheat the oven to 220ºC.

Mix all the dry ingredients together and all the wet ingredients together.

Add the wet to the dry and fold together.

Stir in chocolate chips.

Add heaped tablespoon amounts to a parchment-lined cookie sheet and bake for 12 to 15 minutes. Be careful that the tops reach golden, not brown. Enjoy with tea or cold almond milk.

The jam

Thaw frozen berries and, when thawed, puree. Add the berry puree to a small saucepan and add the Stevia and chia seeds.

Keep stirring the jam over low heat for 5 to 6 minutes – never leaving it unattended or to stick to the saucepan.

Let cool and serve with protein scones or your favourite toast or muffin. 

The cream

Put the ice water, egg white, and non-fat dry milk in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whip attachment. Beat on high for 4  to 5 minutes until it starts to thicken. Stop the machine to scrape down the sides of the bowl to get the milk powder incorporated.

 

Add the lemon juice and continue whipping on the highest speed for another minute or two until thick.

Lower the speed and slowly add sugar or Stevia, then vanilla. Beat until well mixed. 

 

Serve immediately with scones and jam.

 

Recipe by lifestyle blogger Kris Bitton of I Heart Wellness. 

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Michele Lian: Don’t Have Time To Look After Yourself? Here’s What To Do.

The latest from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michele-lian/dont-have-time-to-look-after-yourself-heres-what_b_11178590.html

We’re all running out of time.
This awareness hits me like a ton of bricks whenever I take a step back to think about the big picture of my life, an…

Read more: Health, Mindfulness, Women's Health, Healthy Living, Food, Weight Loss, Fitness, Nutrition, Stress Management, Healthy Lifestyle, Time Management, Clutter, Marie Kondo, Fat Loss, Emotional Eating, Tidying, Peace of Mind, Business News

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Gregg McBride: What’s The 4-Letter Word Your Diet Might Be Missing?

The latest from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gregg-mcbride/whats-the-4letter-word-yo_b_11117174.html

As someone who who is able to share with others that I used to weigh over 450 pounds, I’m not sure which they are more impressed by — the fact that I…

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Julie Dargan: This Spice May Be The Secret Weapon To Weight Loss

The latest from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/julie-dargan/cumin-weight-loss_b_9713172.html

Many of you are aware that a balanced diet and exercise is the recommended method for controlling body weight. Some people may turn to herbal products to promote health and weight loss. What if I told you that there is one spice that could help speed up this process? Sounds good, yes.

Read more: Cumin, Weight Loss, Blood Sugars, Cumin Weight Loss, The Health Benefits of Cumin, Weight Loss and Cumin, Voices, Health Post50, Fifty News

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The Weird Way Harry Potter Could Affect Your Political Views

The latest from: http://www.health.com/mind-body/harry-potter-political-views

Come November, your fiction preferences might have a real-life impact on your choices at the polls. People who have read Harry Potter novels tend to have a lower opinion of Donald Trump, according to a new study—and the more books they’ve read in the series, the less favorably they view the Republican presidential nominee.

These findings held true regardless of a person’s political party, gender, age, level of education, or religious beliefs, says study author Diana Mutz, professor of political science and communication at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication.

The massive popularity of the series, by British author J.K. Rowling, made such research possible; more than 450 million copies of the books have been sold worldwide, and Mutz found that both Republicans and Democrats were equally likely to have read them.

To gauge people’s opinions of the controversial businessman-turned-politician, Mutz surveyed a nationally representative sample of 1,142 Americans. (In addition to Trump and Harry Potter, she also asked them about hot-button election issues such as waterboarding, the death penalty, and the treatment of Muslims and gay people.)

She found that each book people had read in the fantasy series lowered their evaluations of Trump by about two to three points on a 100-point sale. “This may seem small,” Mutz acknowledged in a press release, “but for someone who has read all seven books, the total impact could lower their estimation of Trump by 18 points out of 100.”

To a lesser extent, Harry Potter readership was also associated with a more positive attitude toward Muslim and gay people, and a more negative one toward questions about the use of torture and killing terrorists.

Mutz believes that the books’ message of tolerance and respect for each others’ differences may play a key role in influencing readers’ political views.

For example, she writes, Harry Potter advocates for oppressed house-elves and opposes the evil Lord Voldemort’s quest for “blood purity” among wizards. Trump, on the other hand, has called for a temporary ban on Muslims entering the United States, and made comments about minorities, including women, Mexicans, and disabled people.

The protagonists in Rowling’s books are also reluctant to use violence to settle disputes, she writes, while Trump has supported waterboarding and bombing terrorists’ families.

Finally, Mutz writes, “it may simply be too difficult for Harry Potter readers to ignore the similarities between Trump and the power-hungry Voldemort.”

The study will appear in a special election edition of the journal PS: Political Science and Politics. Mutz concludes—with obvious bias of her own—that she’s not sure if Harry Potter can “defeat Donald Trump” in this year’s election, but that her research raises hope that the values the book preaches could prevail.

“If half-bloods, werewolves and others should be treated with respect and fairness as the Potter stories teach,” she writes, “so too should all human beings.”

 

This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

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